Southend ILS & Debrief

In this video I fly an ILS into London Southend, landing on Runway 05. The IR(R) requires accuracy down to the recommended 500ft, watch as I attempt the IR(A) height and then debrief at home after the flight.

In order to pass the IR(A) test at the end of the CB-IR route, I need to demonstrate that I can perform the relevant procedures and manoeuvres to an appropriate standard.

The IMC rating qualifies you to fly IFR in class D to G airspace, together with making instrument approaches down to the plate minima, but the -recommended- minimum is 500′ if you are out of practice.

The privileges of the IR(R) are those of the Instrument Rating Restricted as follows: (i) the holder of the IR(R) must not fly as pilot in command or co-pilot of an aeroplane flying in Class A, B or C airspace in circumstances which require compliance with the instrument flight rules; (ii) the holder of the IR(R) must not fly as pilot in command or co-pilot of an aeroplane when the aeroplane is taking off or landing at any place if the flight visibility below cloud is less than 1,800 metres; and
(iii) the holder of the IR(R) must not fly as pilot in command or co-pilot of an aeroplane outside the airspace of the United Kingdom in circumstances which require compliance with the instrument flight rules.

Quote from UK CAA document

You can read more on this at the UK CAA website.

The flight was conducted on a rather bumpy day, due to the proximity of a frontal system to the west which kept Heathrow in marginal conditions. An ILS becomes more sensitive as you get closer to touchdown so you need to fly more accurately to maintain tolerances, using the IR(R) and carrying a safety pilot (PPL holder for a good lookout) and or an Instructor is valuable and adds a higher level of safety.

This flight was completed in VMC conditions on IFR flight rules, the approach was hand flown for practice.

Debrief –

Some notes to take from this flight:

I should have used my trusted PLOG, it’s had some good use and it’s well adapted for any flight – especially IFR.  It’s much better than the use of a bit of A4 paper.

Whilst this flight was undertaken in VMC, my altitude keeping was a margin better than previous IFR flights. It’s still a work in progress. My headings should be followed more religiously.  This probably goes back to the point that I should not fixate on one task and that continuing to aviate is the main priority. I usually talk to myself about what I am doing as I do it, because this then means I am using much more brain capacity and can follow more closely any parts of the flight.  

The tolerances are +/- 100ft but I should be aiming for zero and I should treat all headings as If I was flying a precision approach.

Dropping below the glidepath due to turbulence and not correcting should have meant that on the notification from the safety pilot that I was well below the glide, I should have immediately commenced a missed approach.

In Standards Document 01 (A) it does give you quite a wide range of information.  One of the requirements that I didn’t complete in this flight was an in-air approach briefing.  Which could have meant that if we was below the glide path, a go-around would be the correct course of action.  

These are some of the things I’ll incorporate on my Journey to the CB-IR.

Fly safely!

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